Dr. Scott Bialik – Pediatric Dentistry

Serving Brookfield, Bethel, Ridgefield, Newtown, New Fairfield, New Milford, Sandy Hook, Southbury and the Greater Danbury, CT area. Also serving Carmel, Patterson, and Brewster NY

News

Facebook Posts

Special Needs Children Should Visit ADA Member Dentists With Experience Providing Special Care.

The Orange County (CA) Register (9/8) reported that regular trips to the dentist “are just as important as regular trips to the [physician], but they can be a little more intimidating for some people.” Getting kids to love going to the dentist “can be a challenge...but what if you have a child who requires special care because of a developmental disability?” The piece explained the importance for parents “to be aware of the risks if regular dental care is neglected, as children with special needs are predisposed to oral conditions.” Any dentist you see “should be a member of the American Dental Association and the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry and should be actively caring for special needs children in their practice.”
... See MoreSee Less

2 weeks ago  ·  

View on Facebook

Making Dental Visits More Predictable May Help Children With Autism.

NetDoctor (UK) (8/23, McGowen) offers solutions for several situations, including dental visits, that children with autism may find challenging. Stressing the importance of “preparation and structure” to make experiences more predictable for children with autism, the article suggests parents can help children with dental visits by using stories or flash cards “to break down the experience in to its small component parts – from getting there to the waiting room, to the dentists chair etc.”; reading books or watching shows that feature a dental visit to help “make the experience more familiar and less threatening”; and using a timer to show that the visit is “a finite experience.” The article also encourages offering a toy, comforter, music, or audio book during the visit.
A study in The Journal of the American Dental Association suggests desensitization protocols may help children with autism spectrum disorder receive dental care. MouthHealthy.org also provides information for patients with special needs.
... See MoreSee Less

1 month ago  ·  

View on Facebook

Peanut Allergy In Children Cured For Up To Four Years In Immunotherapy Trial.

ABC World News Tonight (8/17) reported on “a potential medical breakthrough for millions who suffer from peanut allergies.”
McClatchy (8/17) reports Australian researchers have discovered that taking a pill filled with probiotics and peanuts can lead to a peanut tolerances for those allergic to the legume for up to four years after the last dose. The study, published in The Lancet Child & Adolescent Health, tracked 48 children for 18 months, half who received a pill with the probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus and peanut protein, and half who were given a placebo. The authors write in the paper, “Our findings show that combined probiotic and peanut oral immunotherapy provides long-lasting clinical benefit compared with placebo, with two-thirds of treated participants symptom free after peanut ingestion 4 years after completing treatment.”
TIME (8/17) reports that in the follow-up four years after the end of the original trial in 2013, “67% of those who got the combination probiotic and peanut therapy were comfortable eating peanuts, compared to only 4% of those who did not get the treatment.” The results are encouraging, but it “may be too early to call this a cure.”
Also covering the story are ABC News (8/17), San Francisco Chronicle (8/17), The Scientist (8/17), and BBC News (UK) (8/17).
... See MoreSee Less

1 month ago  ·  

View on Facebook

Children Who Sleep Less May Have Higher Risk For Type 2 Diabetes, Study Suggests.

The New York Times “Well” blog reports researchers studying 4,525 nine- and 10-year-olds found that the fewer hours a child sleeps per night, the higher that child’s risk for type 2 diabetes. Parents said their children slept an average of 10 hours per night, “with 95 percent sleeping between eight and 12 hours.” The study, published in the journal Pediatrics, “found that the less sleep, the more likely the children were to have higher body mass indexes, higher insulin resistance and higher glucose readings.”
AAP News (8/15) reports that the investigators “did not find associations between sleep and glycated hemoglobin, lipids or blood pressure.” The article adds, “The lack of ties to the latter two suggests ‘that sleep duration does not alter other cardiovascular risk in early life, other than by increased obesity and metabolic risks which, if sustained or accentuated, take time to accelerate cardiovascular risks,’ authors wrote.”
FURTHER READING
Children at Higher Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Sleep an Hour Less Each Night
... See MoreSee Less

1 month ago  ·  

View on Facebook

Parents Warned Of Danger Of Giving Diphenhydramine, Other Medicines To Make Children Sleepy.

ABC World News Tonight (7/29) reported on the “dangerous practice” of “giving children antihistamines and other medicines to make them sleepy.” Some kids “are becoming ill, even dying, from overdoses.” Of particular concern is Benadryl (diphenhydramine). ABC News correspondent Eva Pilgrim explained, “The FDA does not recommend giving Benadryl to children younger than two, because of the potentially life-threatening risks.” For youngsters older than age two, “medical professionals say it needs to be appropriately dosed based on the child’s size.”
... See MoreSee Less

2 months ago  ·  

View on Facebook